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Two days of learning, connection & growth as we highlight innovative social work methodologies, research, and lessons from the past and present to guide us in our future.

May 11-12, 2018

Conference Speakers

Keynote: An Unsettling Journey: Discovering the ‘truth’ of truth and reconciliation

     Carolyn Campbell  has BSW, a Master’s and a PhD in Social Work Education. As a Settler of British descent she is privileged to live as a guest on unceded Mi’kmaq territory outside of Wolfville.  Since retiring from a 25 year position with Dalhousie's School of Social in 2016, Carolyn has expanded her engagement in her local community. As a social justice educator and community activist, she brings experience in teaching, group facilitation, program planning, and project development. She has engaged with a variety of social issues (gender equality, electoral reform, anti-poverty work) but at this time in her life she is particularly passionate about joining with other non-Indigenous people as they explore their de-colonialization responsibilities. She became affiliated with Horizons Community Development Associates in 2017 through the design and facilitation of an 8 hour course called  Stepping Up: Non-Indigenous people’s role in truth and reconciliation.   While working at Dalhousie Carolyn was awarded the Teaching Excellence Award from the Faculty of Health Professions at Dalhousie, and the Dalhousie Alumni Association Award for Excellence in Teaching. She also served as a board member and President of the Canadian Association for Social Work Education. She continues her work with that organization as Project Lead on a four year consultative process (2015-2019) to review and revise the Educational Polices and Accreditation Standards for Canadian Schools of Social Work.

 

Carolyn Campbell has BSW, a Master’s and a PhD in Social Work Education. As a Settler of British descent she is privileged to live as a guest on unceded Mi’kmaq territory outside of Wolfville.

Since retiring from a 25 year position with Dalhousie's School of Social in 2016, Carolyn has expanded her engagement in her local community. As a social justice educator and community activist, she brings experience in teaching, group facilitation, program planning, and project development. She has engaged with a variety of social issues (gender equality, electoral reform, anti-poverty work) but at this time in her life she is particularly passionate about joining with other non-Indigenous people as they explore their de-colonialization responsibilities. She became affiliated with Horizons Community Development Associates in 2017 through the design and facilitation of an 8 hour course called Stepping Up: Non-Indigenous people’s role in truth and reconciliation.

While working at Dalhousie Carolyn was awarded the Teaching Excellence Award from the Faculty of Health Professions at Dalhousie, and the Dalhousie Alumni Association Award for Excellence in Teaching. She also served as a board member and President of the Canadian Association for Social Work Education. She continues her work with that organization as Project Lead on a four year consultative process (2015-2019) to review and revise the Educational Polices and Accreditation Standards for Canadian Schools of Social Work.

Presented by Carolyn Campbell

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission highlighted the importance of conversations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada and challenged social workers to significantly transform their practices.

In this keynote address Carolyn asserts that, before Non-Indigenous people enter into such conversations, we must first turn the gaze inward to expose the colonial foundations of our 'Settler Identities'.

Without doing this difficult, self-reflective work there is little hope of transforming social work from a colonial project to a transformative process of reconciliation.

This keynote will:

  • surface some historical truths of Canadian settlement
  • identify the national narratives that obscure this truth
  • consider the emotional labour required for reconciliation.

Keynote: Speaking our Truths as Indigenous Social Workers: Reconciling Relations in our Practices and our Profession

  Gail Baikie  currently resides in Halifax but grew up in Labrador and continues to maintain a close connection to her community and Labrador Inuit heritage. She aspires to use her gifts and privileges to make a difference to the lives of Indigenous (Aboriginal) peoples.  Prior to joining academia, Gail had a lengthy professional career focused on the healing and social development of Indigenous communities in the Atlantic region. One of the highlights of her career was her work over several years with Davis Inlet /Natuashish, Labrador, an Aboriginal community in crisis.  In 2003, Gail joined the faculty at the Dalhousie University School of Social Work. She has a particular interest in the education and professional development of Indigenous helping professionals with respect to their capacity to practice in-between Indigenous and Euro-western worldviews.   Gail was also recently the academic lead researcher for the Happy Valley-Goose Bay, Labrador site of the national Feminist Northern Network (FemNorthNet) project. This project of the Canadian Research Institute for the Advancement of Women (CRIAW) was focused on research and action with respect to the effects of economic restructuring on women in northern communities. Gail, in partnership with the Community Lead, initiated the ‘Claiming our Place: Women’s Relationship with Rivers’ community–based participatory action research project. The goal was to engage and empower marginalized local women, most of whom are Indigenous, with respect to their involvement and influence in the natural resource development agenda in the region. Specifically the focus was on the effects of the hydro-electric development project in the area, the damning of the Muskrat Falls on the Lower Churchill River. She asserts that natural resource development initiatives must be ‘fair’ to the populations residing in host communities. Recipients of the resources also have an obligation to insist that the goods they receive are the products of a fair and ethical process.   

Gail Baikie currently resides in Halifax but grew up in Labrador and continues to maintain a close connection to her community and Labrador Inuit heritage. She aspires to use her gifts and privileges to make a difference to the lives of Indigenous (Aboriginal) peoples.

Prior to joining academia, Gail had a lengthy professional career focused on the healing and social development of Indigenous communities in the Atlantic region. One of the highlights of her career was her work over several years with Davis Inlet /Natuashish, Labrador, an Aboriginal community in crisis.

In 2003, Gail joined the faculty at the Dalhousie University School of Social Work. She has a particular interest in the education and professional development of Indigenous helping professionals with respect to their capacity to practice in-between Indigenous and Euro-western worldviews. 

Gail was also recently the academic lead researcher for the Happy Valley-Goose Bay, Labrador site of the national Feminist Northern Network (FemNorthNet) project. This project of the Canadian Research Institute for the Advancement of Women (CRIAW) was focused on research and action with respect to the effects of economic restructuring on women in northern communities. Gail, in partnership with the Community Lead, initiated the ‘Claiming our Place: Women’s Relationship with Rivers’ community–based participatory action research project. The goal was to engage and empower marginalized local women, most of whom are Indigenous, with respect to their involvement and influence in the natural resource development agenda in the region. Specifically the focus was on the effects of the hydro-electric development project in the area, the damning of the Muskrat Falls on the Lower Churchill River. She asserts that natural resource development initiatives must be ‘fair’ to the populations residing in host communities. Recipients of the resources also have an obligation to insist that the goods they receive are the products of a fair and ethical process.

 

Presented by Gail Baikie

Indigenous people walk in two worlds and Indigenous social workers practice in-between their worldview and the dominant Euro-western worldview.  Reconciliation, among other things, requires the telling of our truths as Indigenous people and as Indigenous social workers. But truth is understood through one’s individual and cultural frame of reference. As Indigenous peoples we are at risk for not being heard or for being misunderstood by non-Indigenous peoples who receive and interpret our truths through a dominant Euro-western colonial mindset.  Non-Indigenous people must acknowledge and be prepared to ethically engage with us in the space in-between worldviews if we have the hope for re-righting our relations as individuals and as a profession.  

Gail draws on her my research with Indigenous social workers to demonstrate that the everyday interactions between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples, including social work professionals, will typically perpetuate colonial relationships. Mindful and intentional efforts must be made to critically reflect in and on our actions in order to interrupt the taken-for-granted colonial ‘truth’.  In so doing, we can begin to make space for Indigenous ways of knowing, being and doing within our practices and within the profession.

This keynote asks:

  • Reconciliation requires truth telling but are non-Indigenous peoples ready and able to hear our truths as Indigenous peoples and as Indigenous social workers?
  • How might we all engage in reconciliation work in our everyday professional practices as social workers?
  • Are we, as the profession of social work, prepared to do the decolonization work necessary to make space for Indigeneity?

Adverse Childhood Experiences ACE:
Current Health Challenges and Factors Promoting Resilience Among Patients of the Lunenburg Family Health Clinic

  Kevin Dugas  is from Inverness, Cape Breton, and will graduate in May with his BSW from Dalhousie University.  He also has a Master's in Educational Psychology from McGill University in Montreal.  His previous research experiences include working for 2 years as a Laboratory Manager in the Memory Development Lab at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia.  Kevin hopes to build on the current research project for his master's thesis next year in the Dalhousie University MSW program.    Nancy Ross  teaches at the School of Social Work, Dalhousie University. She completed her PhD in Peace Studies and International Development at Bradford University, UK. Her research focused on applying a peacebuilding framework to interpersonal violence. Prior to entering academia her work as a clinical therapist in addiction and mental health settings ignited her interest in adverse childhood experiences and factors promoting resilience.

Kevin Dugas is from Inverness, Cape Breton, and will graduate in May with his BSW from Dalhousie University.  He also has a Master's in Educational Psychology from McGill University in Montreal.  His previous research experiences include working for 2 years as a Laboratory Manager in the Memory Development Lab at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia.  Kevin hopes to build on the current research project for his master's thesis next year in the Dalhousie University MSW program. 

Nancy Ross teaches at the School of Social Work, Dalhousie University. She completed her PhD in Peace Studies and International Development at Bradford University, UK. Her research focused on applying a peacebuilding framework to interpersonal violence. Prior to entering academia her work as a clinical therapist in addiction and mental health settings ignited her interest in adverse childhood experiences and factors promoting resilience.

Presented by Kevin Dugas & Dr. Nancy Ross

This presentation will outline a new pilot project being conducted at the Lunenburg Family Health Clinic involving researchers from Dalhousie's School of Social Work and the Nova Scotia Health Authority. The project is being supported by a NSHRF Establishment Grant.

The intent of this study is to measure adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), current health challenges and factors that promote resilience among adult patients of the Lunenburg Family Health Clinic. Given that many adverse childhood events are inevitable, knowledge about protective factors that may serve to counter the long-term consequences of ACEs are invaluable. 

This pilot project is both developmental and innovative because it will be the first ACE and resilience study to be conducted in Nova Scotia. Piloting this study within a medical practice is representative of an integrative health approach that will include recognition of aspects of lifestyle that may senve as protective factors to mitigate potential negative social and health consequences of a high ACE score.

SafePlace/SafeSpace: Domestic Violence and the Workplace

  Dolly Mosher  is the chair and a founding member of Silent Witness Nova Scotia, an organization that remembers the 63 women murdered in Nova Scotian since 1990 by educating community, professionals and police on the topic of Domestic Homicide. Dolly worked for the RCMP and Halifax Regional Police for 14 years as a Domestic Violence Case Coordinator working with victims of domestic violence at risk of being seriously harmed or killed as a result of violence.  She now works as the Coordinator of Halifax Regional Police Victim Services in addition to her volunteer role with Silent Witness Nova Scotia. Mosher developed SafePlace-SafeSpace to educate employers about the effects of domestic violence in the workplace and the interactive workshop gives attendees the opportunity to examine their own worksite for safety and look at creating a safe place for victims to report domestic violence and a safe space to feel protected while working.

Dolly Mosher is the chair and a founding member of Silent Witness Nova Scotia, an organization that remembers the 63 women murdered in Nova Scotian since 1990 by educating community, professionals and police on the topic of Domestic Homicide. Dolly worked for the RCMP and Halifax Regional Police for 14 years as a Domestic Violence Case Coordinator working with victims of domestic violence at risk of being seriously harmed or killed as a result of violence.

She now works as the Coordinator of Halifax Regional Police Victim Services in addition to her volunteer role with Silent Witness Nova Scotia. Mosher developed SafePlace-SafeSpace to educate employers about the effects of domestic violence in the workplace and the interactive workshop gives attendees the opportunity to examine their own worksite for safety and look at creating a safe place for victims to report domestic violence and a safe space to feel protected while working.

Presented by Dolly Mosher

SafePlace/SafeSpace is a workplace domestic violence workshop to educate employers about how domestic violence affects their employees both in the home and at their workplace. The workshop takes attendants through the workplace death of a young woman in Dartmouth in her workplace and the serious injury to two other co-workers.

By offering employees a SafePlace to disclose violence happening to them without retribution and shame and also offering abusers a Safe Place to disclose they are attempting to get treatment the tabu of silence is lifted. Also, employers will discover the simple placement of office furniture can affect how safe they are when confronting/supporting employees.

You will be educated on of the risk of domestic homicide, how to become an advocate for employees and how employees can get the support of their employer.

Demystifying Sexual Assault Reporting:
Halifax Police Trauma-Informed Approach to Sexualized Violence

  Angela Jeffrey-Haynes  is a RSW currently working for Halifax Regional Police as a Victim Services Caseworker. Angela has obtained a Paralegal Diploma from NSCC (2002), Bachelor's of Social Work Degree from Carleton University, Ottawa (2006), and a Master's Degree in Social Work with a concentration in Communities, Organizations, Policy, Planning and Administration (2010) from Syracuse University.  Angela has worked in a number of roles including as a Foster Care Caseworker for refugee and domestic children; Counselor/Facilitator for an Intimate Partner Violence Intervention Program; Educator on Dating/Domestic Violence/Elder Abuse; Rape Crisis Counselor; and Program Coordinator for programs serving families.  She was an active Board of Directors member for Avalon Sexual Assault Centre from 2011-2014. In addition to various committees/advisory groups, Angela is currently the Vice Chair for New Start Counselling, an intervention and prevention program for men who have been abusive towards their female partners. She is also presently facilitating training to police across Nova Scotia on a Trauma Informed Response to sexual assault.  In the last number of years, Angela has done shortterm volunteer work in Haiti as well as Mozambique (Africa) working with vulnerable populations.

Angela Jeffrey-Haynes is a RSW currently working for Halifax Regional Police as a Victim Services Caseworker. Angela has obtained a Paralegal Diploma from NSCC (2002), Bachelor's of Social Work Degree from Carleton University, Ottawa (2006), and a Master's Degree in Social Work with a concentration in Communities, Organizations, Policy, Planning and Administration (2010) from Syracuse University.

Angela has worked in a number of roles including as a Foster Care Caseworker for refugee and domestic children; Counselor/Facilitator for an Intimate Partner Violence Intervention Program; Educator on Dating/Domestic Violence/Elder Abuse; Rape Crisis Counselor; and Program Coordinator for programs serving families.

She was an active Board of Directors member for Avalon Sexual Assault Centre from 2011-2014. In addition to various committees/advisory groups, Angela is currently the Vice Chair for New Start Counselling, an intervention and prevention program for men who have been abusive towards their female partners. She is also presently facilitating training to police across Nova Scotia on a Trauma Informed Response to sexual assault.

In the last number of years, Angela has done shortterm volunteer work in Haiti as well as Mozambique (Africa) working with vulnerable populations.

Presented by Angela Jeffrey-Haynes

Gain insight into the trauma-informed approach and training of Halifax Police officers on sexual assault. This presentation will de-mystify the reporting and investigation process of sexual assaults, how victims are supported and how best practices are incorporated.

This presentation will educate social workers who may come into contact with sexual assault victims. They will understand how trauma-informed approaches can be utilized in a policing system and learn what types of supports are available to victims of sexual assault at Halifax Police

Social workers walk away with an understanding of the general sexual assault investigation process. 

Jordan’s Principle: Child First Initiative

  Jessica Greggains  lives in Sydney, NS with her husband and two little boys. an holds a degree in Political Science and Elementary Education and is currently working on her Masters in Counselling Psychology. She is currently the Jordan’s Principle service coordinator in Membertou and Potlotek.   Kelly Holley  lives in Marion Bridge with her husband. She has three grown children. Kelly holds a degree in Community Studies and Special Education.  She has worked with aboriginal people in a variety of settings including Family Resource Centers and First Nations Education Systems. She is currently the Jordan’s Principle service coordinator in Eskasoni.   Terri-Anne Johnson  from Membertou First Nation. She has two spoiled fur babies. Terri-Anne holds a degree in Community Studies as well as diplomas in Human Services and Community Residential Care.  She has worked extensively with First Nations families throughout Nova Scotia.  She is currently the Jordan’s Principle service coordinator in We’koqma’q and Wagmatcook.

Jessica Greggains lives in Sydney, NS with her husband and two little boys. an holds a degree in Political Science and Elementary Education and is currently working on her Masters in Counselling Psychology. She is currently the Jordan’s Principle service coordinator in Membertou and Potlotek.

Kelly Holley lives in Marion Bridge with her husband. She has three grown children. Kelly holds a degree in Community Studies and Special Education.  She has worked with aboriginal people in a variety of settings including Family Resource Centers and First Nations Education Systems. She is currently the Jordan’s Principle service coordinator in Eskasoni.

Terri-Anne Johnson from Membertou First Nation. She has two spoiled fur babies. Terri-Anne holds a degree in Community Studies as well as diplomas in Human Services and Community Residential Care.  She has worked extensively with First Nations families throughout Nova Scotia.  She is currently the Jordan’s Principle service coordinator in We’koqma’q and Wagmatcook.

Presented by Jessica Greggains, Kelly Holle & Terri Anne Johnson

“First Nations children have experienced historical disadvantages due to Canada’s repeated failure to take into account their best interests, as well as their historical, geographically and cultural needs and circumstances…” - (Government of Canada/Indigenous Services/Jordan’s Principle website)

The Truth and Reconciliation process has challenged us all to improve the life experiences of Indigenous children and youth.

Jordan’s Principle is one part of this process.

It is a child first initiative named in the memory of Jordan River Anderson.  It ensures that all First Nations children can access social, educational, health and cultural services without delay.

Social workers will be provided with information on the reason for Jordan’s Principle for First Nations children and how to access support services in the areas of health, social, education, cultural and recreation.

Social Media: An Innovative Tool for Community Development

  Alec Stratford  is the Executive Director/ Registrar at Nova Scotia College of Social Workers, Alec has  worked as a child protection social worker, school support counselor, community organizer wand as a  sessional instructor. Alec has a passion and dedication for community development and believes that engaged informed communities can lead to transformative change. Alec brings a wealth of knowledge on adult and experiential learning and its connection to social change

Alec Stratford is the Executive Director/ Registrar at Nova Scotia College of Social Workers, Alec has  worked as a child protection social worker, school support counselor, community organizer wand as a  sessional instructor. Alec has a passion and dedication for community development and believes that engaged informed communities can lead to transformative change. Alec brings a wealth of knowledge on adult and experiential learning and its connection to social change

Presented by Alec Stratford

This session will identify foundational community development theory and highlight the practical application of social media to achieve strategic outcomes towards broader social change.

We will explore how to ground campaign tactics through social media tools and engage participants in the development of their own campaigns.

 


Conference Agenda

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Other Events

 Have you ever had the pleasure of attending a  ‘kitchen party ?’ It's a magical experience filled with laughter, music and great conversation.  Do you play an instrument? Can you sing? Do you have a good sense of humor or do you have a favourite ‘yarn’ you would like to share?  Be part of our very first  Spring Kitchen Party!  Share your talent and join the party.   Interested?  Contact Claire Sampson-MacDonald at  Claire.sampson-macdonald@nshealth.ca  or Annemieke Vink at  annemieke.vink@nscsw.org  on or before May 4, 2018.    Let’s make this an event to remember. 

Have you ever had the pleasure of attending a ‘kitchen party?’ It's a magical experience filled with laughter, music and great conversation.

Do you play an instrument? Can you sing? Do you have a good sense of humor or do you have a favourite ‘yarn’ you would like to share?

Be part of our very first Spring Kitchen Party! Share your talent and join the party.

Interested? Contact Claire Sampson-MacDonald at Claire.sampson-macdonald@nshealth.ca or Annemieke Vink at annemieke.vink@nscsw.org on or before May 4, 2018.

Let’s make this an event to remember. 

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Private Practice Networking

Are you a private practitioner? Join your colleagues in private practice and learn how the Private Practice Committee is advocating for change. You'll engage in an informal discussion with fellow practitioners about the strengths, barriers and possible solutions of private practice. 

Interested? Meeting time is May 11th at 3:45 PM exact location at the hotel TBA that afternoon. 

Social Policy Consultation

We need your insight! Join the College's Social Policy Committee for a consultation on our social policy framework.

Interested? Meeting time is May 11th at 3:45 PM exact location at the hotel TBA that afternoon.  

Fees & Hotel Information

 

Conference location

Best western chocolate lake
250 St Margarets Bay Rd,Halifax, NS
B2N 1E6

Rooms are blocked off for the conference. Call (902) 477-5611 by April 10th to reserve
Quote the code NS College of Social Workers.

Conference Registration Fees

Friday May 11th only

  • $50.00 members
  • $35.00 member students/retirees
  • $75.00 non-members
  • $45.00 non-member students/retirees

Full Conference

  • $75.00 members
  • $50.00 member students/retirees
  • $110.00 non-members
  • $70.00 non-member students/retirees

Saturday May 12th only

  • $25.00 members
  • $15.00 member students/retirees
  • $35.00 non-members
  • $25.00 non-member students/retirees

Deadline to register is Monday, May 7, 2018 at 4:30 PM AST.

Refunds will be accepted until Monday, May 7, 2018 at 4:30 PM AST.


Conference Bursaries

The College and the CASW have bursaries available to help members attend the upcoming 2018 NSCSW Spring  ConferenceThese bursaries will cover your conference registration fees and travel costs.

We value diversity and strive to create opportunities for Nova Scotians with intersectional identities who have historically faced barriers. Preference for bursary awards will also be given to applicants who identify as holding an identity that has historically faced barriers to accessing educational opportunities.

You can apply for one of the following bursaries: 

  • Two $500 bursaries
  • Two $300 bursaries
  • Two $200 bursaries
  • Two $75 bursaries 

Please apply for the bursary based the distance you'll travel to the conference located in Halifax.

Examples

  • If traveling from Sydney to Halifax you will apply for $500.00
  • If traveling from Yarmouth to Halifax you will apply for $300.00
  • If traveling from to New Minas to Halifax you will apply for $200.00
  • If traveling within Halifax apply for $75.00

The deadline to apply is April 27th. Bursary decisions will be announced May 1, 2018.

If you’re selected to receive a conference bursary a cheque will be mailed to your home address. You are responsible for your conference registration and for arranging your accommodations and travel.

Conference Vendor Opportunity

We’re looking for three vendors to join us at the College’s Spring Conference!

When: May 11th from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Where: Best Western Chocolate Lake Hotel, 250 St. Margarets Bay Rd., Halifax, NS
Who: Community & diverse groups, local artisans
What: Share your message, art, project etc. with Nova Scotia social workers
Cost: $50 or donated door prize of equal value
Details: Table, chair, outlet & wifi provided, 8:00 AM set up time & 4:00 removal time